Art Display

Flowers, 2nd Grade

Happy Spring! 

Enjoy this Spring inspired project created by our 2nd Grade Artists!  Students were introduced to the work of Andy Warhol, through the use of an Emaze presentation.  Students learned the history of Andy Warhol and how he became the Prince of POP! After introducing students to the artist students used art criticism to answer questions, “What do you see? What do you think? What do you wonder? when looking at his,“Flower” print.

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Andy Warhol, Flowers, 1964. 

We also watched a neat video on Pop Art that my second graders just loved!

We got started by creating our grassy background. Students used repetition in lines to imitate the grass seen in Andy Warhol’s Flowers. Our second graders used a variety of lines (tall, thin, thick, wavy, straight) to create their grassy  texture. They also played with different  values of green and blue oil pastels to create depth, highlights, and shadows.  Next, we used our mop brush to paint green and black liquid watercolor over our entire paper. We learned that this is called a resist or as I like to call magic

On day two, we used simple shapes to draw flowers. Students drew their flowers on a small 4”x 4” piece of paper. These were then transferred to a Styrofoam board.  I have to give a big shout out to Cassie Stephens for her awesome printmaking techniques and videos! We traced over their lines two times to create an imprint in the foam. We used two different color pens to keep track of where we have been and to make our lines were deep enough. Next, we cut out our flower shape and prepared to print!  Next class students will be using the printmaking process to print their flower 2 to 4 times. Students use their knowledge of warm and cool colors and friendly colors. Students enjoyed taking turns at the printmaking station and pulling multiple prints (copies) of their flowers just like Andy Warhol did! I just love this lesson and couldn’t wait to blog about it. Inspiration for this lesson came from Deep Space Sparkle! 

FullSizeRender-42B’s Flowers are currently on display outside the cafeteria, just in time for spring! I couldn’t wait to get these artworks back from Square 1 art so that I could put them out on display for all to see and enjoy.

Tints and Shades, 2nd Grade

I scream, you scream, we all scream for ice cream!  Especially ice cream cones made 6 scoops high with tints and shades and a cherry on top!

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This deliciously fun art project was created by our SWEET Second Graders! This lesson was inspired by one I found on Pinterest!  Here is the link! Our Second graders loved this lesson from start to finish.

We got started this lesson by created value using one color! After choosing an ice cream flavor, students got started mixing white (tints) and black (shades) to their color (hue) to create a value scale. Here is a look at our second graders creating their color value scales.

FullSizeRender-22C reviewing value on day 2 

On our second meeting day, we cut out our cone and ice cream scopes. We arranged our scopes from light (top) to dark (bottom) and collaged them onto our white background paper. We made them overlap and some even made their ice cream look melty or wiggly. Once our 6 scopes were glued down, students could add decorative toppings! Hole punches and scrap paper were used to create colorful or chocolate sprinkles. Don’t forget the cherry on top!

Enjoy our Tints and Shades with a Cherry on Top!

We all wanted to make a trip to Uncle Ed’s Creamery  for some homemade ice cream after this lesson!

4th Grade, Roman Mosaics

Take a look at these beautiful Roman inspired mosaics made by our 4th grade artists. A mosaic is the art of creating  images with an assemblage of small pieces of colored glass, stone, or other materials. We looked at how the Romans and other ancient people made these elaborate mosaics. We observed how they might have been used to make a counter top or a wall or even the whole floor of a room. Roman mosaics were practical because they were easy to wash and helped to keep the house cool. They were also beautiful. The Romans loved to combine a practical purpose with wonderful art. Our 4th graders worked individually to create beautiful mosaic birds or flowers. They also worked collaboratively for a number of weeks this winter to piece together images of olive trees and irises inspired by Vincent Van Gogh.  A special thanks to Mrs. Mahan and Mrs. Ryan for assisting  our 4th graders on this special artist journey. These mosaic masterpieces will be on display in the gym from 3:30-4:00 next Tuesday, March 15th for a “Together for Toll Gate” preview. They will be going to the art auction Friday, March 18th. I just love love these mosaics and will miss seeing them in the art room everyday.

These chosen mosaics were inspired by the following Vincent Van Gogh paintings; Orchard with Blossoming Trees, 1888, Olive Orchard mid-June 1889, and Irises, 1889

Clay Loom Weavings, 5th grade

Check out these stunning clay loom weavings! I was out on Friday but left one of my 5th grade classes to finish their weavings. I just loved coming back to these colorful creations.     It’s been fun watching each stage of this lesson from start to finish. The inspiration for this lesson came from my colleague, Kathleen Belton, Art Teacher at SB. I saw these beautiful clay looms in her art room and knew I needed to share this lesson with my 5th graders. I’m so glad that I did! Thanks again, Kathleen!

I love this lesson because it intertwines clay and weaving. Two mediums I love teaching for their tactile qualities. We began this lesson by creating our clay looms. Students rolled a slab, no larger than 7″ x 9″. Next, students created imprints in the clay, with texture tools. Using our needle tool, students cut their clay looms shape. It was neat seeing such a variety of loom shapes both organic and geometric. Lastly, we used a 4″ x 5″ template to trace and cut a center hole. With our center slab removed, we used our stylus to create a few holes in the clay near the top (for our hanger) and near the edge of our clay. With two visits to the kiln, once to fire our greenware clay, two for glazing, our decorative looms were ready to string (warp) and weave on . We were introduced to the weaving process, through the use of an AWESOME youtube video. Here it is http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LbtKnvc_9No. Students always want to know, “where  the hands are!” It’s true our hands are our best tool when creating a weaving and interlacing our materials. I was really impressed with how quickly our 5th graders prepared their looms for weaving. Our 5th graders had a lot of fun with this lesson. It was neat seeing students interlace weaving techniques, create patterns, play with yarn textures and color, and even try to create landscapes out of their weaving.

Take a look at 5D and 5L wonderful weavings! I could seriously look at these all day! Hangers are the only thing left to add!

We used three weaving techniques, Over Under, Rya, and the Closed Slot Weave.  Ask your 5th grader what they learned and enjoyed about this lesson! They know many new weaving terms!

Monet Water lilies, 2nd Grade

Our second graders created these stunning water lilies inspired by Claude Monet. We added an element of dimension to this lesson with the addition of tissue paper lily blossoms. I just love how these came out! In addition to their individual paintings, students worked collaboratively on their classes’ art auction paintings. A big thank you to our parent volunteers, Mrs. Sanderson Bowden, Mrs. Deschapelles, Mrs. Gicquel for working with our second grade artists on this special project. 2B and 2C’s waterlilies will be going to the, Together for TG, Art Auction on March 18th. Here is a sneak peak at our artists at work!

 

Students loved adding quick directional brush strokes and watching colors mix together on the canvas.

We focused our learning, on the last 20 years of Monet’s life, where he concentrated his efforts almost exclusively on the picturesque water lily pond that he created on his property in Giverny. We learned that Monet painting En plein air (outdoors) and observed how light and time of day inspired his subjects. This encouraged our second graders, to create their own water lily painting inspired by a time of day. They used color, value, movement, and texture to capture Monet signature style. They did so brilliantly.   Enjoy!

Falling Leaves, 3rd Grade

This is a lesson near and dear to my heart. This is the third year I’ve taught it, and it just keeps getting better! This year, our third grade artists choose the time of day they wanted to capture their falling leaves.  Third time’s the charm! I just love the emotion and personality in each work of art!

Enjoy these beautiful falling leaves, created by our 3rd grade artists.

A batik is a traditional method of producing colored designs on textiles by applying wax and dye. Instead of using the traditional materials, we created our batiks by using crayons, oil pastels, tempera paint and white paper. We began by studying our leaves organic shapes and texture. We arranged our leaves so there was balance and harmony in our composition. The texture rubbing technique was used to create each leaves shape and veins. We used oil pastels to mix and blend colors inside the blade part of our leaves, making them look so realistic!  Our 3rd graders did a wonderful job blending colors, creating values, and making their leaves look so delicate and beautiful.

We began the batik process by first wrinkling our papers into a ball, making sure that our artwork was on the inside. Carefully, we unfolded our paper and smoothed out the creases. Next, students brought their papers to the painting station, where they covered their whole paper with blue and purple tempera paint.  Lastly, students brought their projects to the sink area, where we ran water over our paper and watched as the paint ran off our leaves. Our backgrounds (negative space) held the paint and made for a beautiful backdrop to our vivid fall leaves. Our 3rd graders captured all that is sweet and special about Fall, the slight breeze, rich color, and crisp air.

Exploring Lines, Kindergarten

IMG_7701Kindergarten is flying high in art!

Can you guess the element of art our Kindergarteners have been busy exploring? If you thought lines, you are correct!  Our Kindergarten friends have been learning all about lines. Our unit on line got started with a special poem titled, “Larry the Line”.  You can find this wonderful poem on Cassie Stephens art blog! After learning the words and the hand motions to the poem, students got to meet Larry (the stuffed animal snake) and practice creating lines with his body. We put all our knowledge to great use when we began creating our hot air balloons. We used a variety of lines (vertical, diagonal, horizontal, spiral, curved, and angle lines) to decorate the inside of our balloon shape. Next, we explored color and learned how to use our paint brushes like a ballerina, (on their toes not on their bottoms).After being introduced to tempera paint, students began adding colors to their hot air balloons to make them look realistic. We decorated squares with vertical and horizontal lines to make them look like realistic baskets. After cutting and attaching string, Kindergarten was ready for take off. Art has been such a sweet adventure with TG’s youngest artists! Oh the places you’ll go in ART!

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Check out our first project of the school year, now on display outside the  cafeteria. We are currently learning about shapes and have been busy creating Indian corn, leaves, and Monsters. Stay tuned for those projects. They just went home with your budding artist!

The sky’s the limit!

Keith Haring inspired Figures, 4th grade

These Keith Haring action poses were created by our fantastic fourth grade artists. We began the year by using Keith Haring’s iconic style and images to review our art room rules, create a collaborative mural, and make 4 dynamic action poses.

IMG_7556We did some practice drawings in our sketchbooks to get us familiar with Keith Haring’s distinct style. These colorful and dynamic works of art are currently on display outside the art room.

We learned how to draw a Keith Haring figure by first creating a stick figure and then giving it body! After drawing an outline around the stick figure, we erased our original “skeleton” lines. We practiced drawing light and filling our space with an exciting action pose. Later, students mixed and applied tempera paint to create flat areas of color similar to that of Haring’s work. Do you notice the use of complementary colors? Students used contrasting colors in two of their four action compositions. 4M created one action composition due to time. We completed this project by using our sharpie markers to outline our dynamic figures and create expression lines. Students used bold lines and vivid colors to bring their Keith Haring inspired figures to life. I have a new found love for Keith Haring’s art.

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Indian corn, 1st Grade

Tara   Reegan   Lorenzo   Jack

Our first grade artists have been busy creating these beautiful indian corn paintings. I’ve loved watching these observational drawings come to life! We begin this project by looking at a photograph of Indian corn and using our observational skills to answer questions like; What do you see? What do you think? What do you wonder? Once we identified the subject matter for our next project, we read the book, “Corn” by Gail Gibbons. We looked at how corn grows, how it got its name, How many different kinds of corn there are, and how it is used in our food and the food of animals.

With the help of some real indian corn, students got to work studying the shape of the cob, the husk and the kernels. We drew these observations using sharpie markers. Once our shapes and lines were drawn, it was time for color! Students used pan watercolor sets and liquid watercolor to mix colors and paint their kernels. Students brought their indian corn to life and off the paper by creating a wood texture for the background and even adding a shadow to make their corn look 3 dimensional!  I Just love looking at these fall still lifes. They currently on display for all to see an admire!

2nd Grade, Starry Night Pumpkins

Happy Halloween! Enjoy these spectacular Second Grade, “Starry Night” skies behind a pumpkin patch. This project was so sweet from start to finish! We began by learning how to draw pumpkins using curved lines to make our pumpkins look rounded and 3 dimensional.  We then mixed primary colors, red and yellow to create our secondary color orange. To make our pumpkins look three dimensional we mixed more yellow paint to make our pumpkins lighter and red to make our orange darker. Next class, we cut out our pumpkins and composed them on black construction paper to create space through overlapping.  Students loved learning about Vincent Van Gogh and studying the famous “Starry Night”. They especially loved watching this starry night (interactive animation) video. Check it out!

You can purchase this awesome app for ipads and iphones! My second graders just loved this. We played it over and over again as we created our own starry night inspired skies. Students used oil pastels to create their swirling lines and quick dashes of color! They created movement through color and line! Enjoy the work of our 2nd grade artists!