Autumn

Birch Trees, 4th Grade

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This 4th grade art lesson began with an Emaze presentation!! This amazing visual experience gave us a up close and personal look at Gustav’s Klimt’s, Birch Trees series! We really felt like we were walking around an art gallery looking at the work of this famous artist! We used our observational skills to answer the following questions, what do you see? What you think? What do you wonder?

Gustav Klimt

After answering questions, we discussed how artists create a sense of space in landscapes. We observed that things closest to us were darker, more detailed, and larger in size. The opposite was true about things further away. They appeared lighter and smaller in size.

Day 1 got started with a demo using different sized masking tape to block off our birch trees and create our realistic background. In order to make sure our tape wasn’t too sticky, we used lint from our clothing, to take some of the stick off. We also created and illusion of depth by making our trees thicker in the foreground and thinner in the middle and background. Next, we created a horizontal line that separating our sky from our ground. We used warm and cool   watercolors to bring our landscape to life. We practiced different watercolor techniques like wet-into-wet, dry brush, and lifting.  If there was time, students could remove their tape from their birch trees shape.

On Day 2, we focused on creating the textures observed in the fallen leaves and birch tree. We learned how to reuse old credit cards as stamps, dipping them in black tempera paint and scrapping them on our birch trees shape.  This created the black and gray horizontal marking found on real birch trees. Lastly, we used our paint brushes to create quick dashes of autumn colors for our fallen leaves.  This texture was similar to the the one found in Gustav’s Klimt’s, Birch Forest I.  I’ve been wanting to do a birch tree art lesson for years and this one did not disappoint! It was so much fun from start to finish. These autumn landscapes are just fantastic!

Our autumn birch trees are currently outside the art room! They have gotten a lot of attention from parents, staff, and students  walking by!

Falling Leaves, 3rd Grade

This is a lesson near and dear to my heart. This is the third year I’ve taught it, and it just keeps getting better! This year, our third grade artists choose the time of day they wanted to capture their falling leaves.  Third time’s the charm! I just love the emotion and personality in each work of art!

Enjoy these beautiful falling leaves, created by our 3rd grade artists.

A batik is a traditional method of producing colored designs on textiles by applying wax and dye. Instead of using the traditional materials, we created our batiks by using crayons, oil pastels, tempera paint and white paper. We began by studying our leaves organic shapes and texture. We arranged our leaves so there was balance and harmony in our composition. The texture rubbing technique was used to create each leaves shape and veins. We used oil pastels to mix and blend colors inside the blade part of our leaves, making them look so realistic!  Our 3rd graders did a wonderful job blending colors, creating values, and making their leaves look so delicate and beautiful.

We began the batik process by first wrinkling our papers into a ball, making sure that our artwork was on the inside. Carefully, we unfolded our paper and smoothed out the creases. Next, students brought their papers to the painting station, where they covered their whole paper with blue and purple tempera paint.  Lastly, students brought their projects to the sink area, where we ran water over our paper and watched as the paint ran off our leaves. Our backgrounds (negative space) held the paint and made for a beautiful backdrop to our vivid fall leaves. Our 3rd graders captured all that is sweet and special about Fall, the slight breeze, rich color, and crisp air.

Indian corn, 1st Grade

Tara   Reegan   Lorenzo   Jack

Our first grade artists have been busy creating these beautiful indian corn paintings. I’ve loved watching these observational drawings come to life! We begin this project by looking at a photograph of Indian corn and using our observational skills to answer questions like; What do you see? What do you think? What do you wonder? Once we identified the subject matter for our next project, we read the book, “Corn” by Gail Gibbons. We looked at how corn grows, how it got its name, How many different kinds of corn there are, and how it is used in our food and the food of animals.

With the help of some real indian corn, students got to work studying the shape of the cob, the husk and the kernels. We drew these observations using sharpie markers. Once our shapes and lines were drawn, it was time for color! Students used pan watercolor sets and liquid watercolor to mix colors and paint their kernels. Students brought their indian corn to life and off the paper by creating a wood texture for the background and even adding a shadow to make their corn look 3 dimensional!  I Just love looking at these fall still lifes. They currently on display for all to see an admire!

2nd Grade, Starry Night Pumpkins

Happy Halloween! Enjoy these spectacular Second Grade, “Starry Night” skies behind a pumpkin patch. This project was so sweet from start to finish! We began by learning how to draw pumpkins using curved lines to make our pumpkins look rounded and 3 dimensional.  We then mixed primary colors, red and yellow to create our secondary color orange. To make our pumpkins look three dimensional we mixed more yellow paint to make our pumpkins lighter and red to make our orange darker. Next class, we cut out our pumpkins and composed them on black construction paper to create space through overlapping.  Students loved learning about Vincent Van Gogh and studying the famous “Starry Night”. They especially loved watching this starry night (interactive animation) video. Check it out!

You can purchase this awesome app for ipads and iphones! My second graders just loved this. We played it over and over again as we created our own starry night inspired skies. Students used oil pastels to create their swirling lines and quick dashes of color! They created movement through color and line! Enjoy the work of our 2nd grade artists!

Autumn Leaves Batik, 3rd Grade

“Autumn is a second Spring where every leaf is a flower.” -Albert Camus

Enjoy these beautiful falling leaves, created by our 3rd grade artists.

A batik is a traditional method of producing colored designs on textiles by applying wax and dye. Instead of using these traditional materials, we created our batiks by using crayons, oil pastels, tempera paint and white paper. We used leaves as the subject matter for our Autumn studies. We began by studying our leaves organic shapes and texture. We arranged our leaves so there was balance and harmony in our composition. The texture rubbing technique was used to create each leaves shape and veins. Fall colors were applied to the inside of our leaves (positive space) using oil pastels. Our 3rd graders did a wonderful job blending colors, creating values, and making their leaves look so delicate and beautiful.

We began the batik process by first wrinkling our papers into a ball, making sure that our artwork was on the inside. Carefully, we unfolded our paper and smoothed out the creases. Next, students brought their papers to the painting station, where they covered their whole paper with blue and purple tempera paint.  Lastly, students brought their projects to the sink area, where we ran water over our paper and watched as the paint ran off our leaves. Our backgrounds (negative space) held the paint and made for a beautiful backdrop to our vivid fall leaves. Our 3rd graders captured all that is sweet and special about Fall, the slight breeze, rich color, and crisp air.

These Autumn leaves were created by Mrs. O’Shaughnessy’s 3rd Grade Artists. Stay tuned for a look at 3M’s and 3C’s Autumn leaves.

As promised here is a look at 3M’s Autumn leaves.

4th grade, Autumn leaf studies

Fall into The Elements of Art, with these beautiful Autumn illustrations created by our 4th graders. 

Line- Various marks were used to create each leafs shape and inner structure.

Shape– Leaves are organic shapes! We traced a minimum of 7 organic shapes in our composition. Leaf size and types varied.

Color– Autumn leaves are rich in color. Hues like red, yellow, green, orange, and brown were used to bring our leaves to life. Using watercolor pencils, we mixed colors and blended them together using a brush and water.

Value– Sometimes our leaves changed in value from dark to light.

Space– Space is the area between and around our leaves. The space around an object is often called negative space.

Texture–  The structure of our leaves (veins) were draw to create “visual” texture. Our center leaf, captured texture through seeing and feeling.

Form– To study our leaves we had to look and feel them. Our 2-dimentional leaves gave the illusion of form while our center relief held it.

The elements of art are the building blocks used by artists to create a work of art. 

Autumn Tree Studies

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5L tree studies shown together. I loved how each students personality and unique use of mark making came out in these. 

Our 5th Graders have been busy studying trees! This lesson has easily become one of my favorites. My fifth graders would agree they have loved watching their trees take shape.

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I love the expressive use of line in Maggie and Annabel’s tree studies! 

Students began their drawings by blocking in the shapes of their trees. They then began adding details through the texture of their trunk, branches, and leaves. We added value through the use of charcoal and chalk pastels. While we were drawing our trees in art, 5th graders were also exploring autumn trees in Music. After going on a nature walk, students wrote about what they saw, heard, and felt.  I can’t wait to show you our 5th graders poems and drawings on display together.