color

Flowers, 2nd Grade

Happy Spring! 

Enjoy this Spring inspired project created by our 2nd Grade Artists!  Students were introduced to the work of Andy Warhol, through the use of an Emaze presentation.  Students learned the history of Andy Warhol and how he became the Prince of POP! After introducing students to the artist students used art criticism to answer questions, “What do you see? What do you think? What do you wonder? when looking at his,“Flower” print.

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Andy Warhol, Flowers, 1964. 

We also watched a neat video on Pop Art that my second graders just loved!

We got started by creating our grassy background. Students used repetition in lines to imitate the grass seen in Andy Warhol’s Flowers. Our second graders used a variety of lines (tall, thin, thick, wavy, straight) to create their grassy  texture. They also played with different  values of green and blue oil pastels to create depth, highlights, and shadows.  Next, we used our mop brush to paint green and black liquid watercolor over our entire paper. We learned that this is called a resist or as I like to call magic

On day two, we used simple shapes to draw flowers. Students drew their flowers on a small 4”x 4” piece of paper. These were then transferred to a Styrofoam board.  I have to give a big shout out to Cassie Stephens for her awesome printmaking techniques and videos! We traced over their lines two times to create an imprint in the foam. We used two different color pens to keep track of where we have been and to make our lines were deep enough. Next, we cut out our flower shape and prepared to print!  Next class students will be using the printmaking process to print their flower 2 to 4 times. Students use their knowledge of warm and cool colors and friendly colors. Students enjoyed taking turns at the printmaking station and pulling multiple prints (copies) of their flowers just like Andy Warhol did! I just love this lesson and couldn’t wait to blog about it. Inspiration for this lesson came from Deep Space Sparkle! 

FullSizeRender-42B’s Flowers are currently on display outside the cafeteria, just in time for spring! I couldn’t wait to get these artworks back from Square 1 art so that I could put them out on display for all to see and enjoy.

Monet Water lilies, 2nd Grade

Our second graders created these stunning water lilies inspired by Claude Monet. We added an element of dimension to this lesson with the addition of tissue paper lily blossoms. I just love how these came out! In addition to their individual paintings, students worked collaboratively on their classes’ art auction paintings. A big thank you to our parent volunteers, Mrs. Sanderson Bowden, Mrs. Deschapelles, Mrs. Gicquel for working with our second grade artists on this special project. 2B and 2C’s waterlilies will be going to the, Together for TG, Art Auction on March 18th. Here is a sneak peak at our artists at work!

 

Students loved adding quick directional brush strokes and watching colors mix together on the canvas.

We focused our learning, on the last 20 years of Monet’s life, where he concentrated his efforts almost exclusively on the picturesque water lily pond that he created on his property in Giverny. We learned that Monet painting En plein air (outdoors) and observed how light and time of day inspired his subjects. This encouraged our second graders, to create their own water lily painting inspired by a time of day. They used color, value, movement, and texture to capture Monet signature style. They did so brilliantly.   Enjoy!

Paul Klee inspired fish, 3rd Grade

Paul kleeHere’s a look back at a 3rd grade project finished a couple weeks back. We began by looking at Paul Klee’s painting, “Goldfish”. This was a great lesson because it allowed us to review a lot of art elements and concepts. We begin day one by creating our center fish. Students use lines and shapes to make a realistic or fantasy fish in the center of their paper. We observed how Paul Klee used vivid, and bright colors to make his fish stand out from the background. We reviewed warm and cool colors and used them to create our fish and habitat. We also reviewed lines, patterns and shapes and used them to create visual texture in our fish.

On day two we focused on the smaller fish and plant life around the edges of the paper, creating a decorative border. We learned that Klee’s, “Goldfish” was painted using two kinds of paints: watercolor and oil paints. The watercolor allowed for thinner more translucent effects. The oil paints for thicker, more vivid colors. Instead of oil paints we used oil pastels to acquire the same painterly qualities. This allowed us to create a watercolor resist! Enjoy these fishy creations made by our 3rd grade artists.

See-Think-Wonder

Part of being a great artist is being able to observe and talk about art. We’ve gotten started many new units of study this year, by answering the following three questions; What do you see? What do you think? What do you wonder? 

This visual thinking routine has encouraged our artists to make thoughtful observations and interpretations when looking at art. I’ve also loved listening to our students develop their own ideas and questions about the art they are studying. It’s been a great lead into a new unit of study. In this case, it was Paul Klee’s, “Goldfish”. This was a great painting to study since there is so much mystery to it.

 

Birch Trees, 4th Grade

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This 4th grade art lesson began with an Emaze presentation!! This amazing visual experience gave us a up close and personal look at Gustav’s Klimt’s, Birch Trees series! We really felt like we were walking around an art gallery looking at the work of this famous artist! We used our observational skills to answer the following questions, what do you see? What you think? What do you wonder?

Gustav Klimt

After answering questions, we discussed how artists create a sense of space in landscapes. We observed that things closest to us were darker, more detailed, and larger in size. The opposite was true about things further away. They appeared lighter and smaller in size.

Day 1 got started with a demo using different sized masking tape to block off our birch trees and create our realistic background. In order to make sure our tape wasn’t too sticky, we used lint from our clothing, to take some of the stick off. We also created and illusion of depth by making our trees thicker in the foreground and thinner in the middle and background. Next, we created a horizontal line that separating our sky from our ground. We used warm and cool   watercolors to bring our landscape to life. We practiced different watercolor techniques like wet-into-wet, dry brush, and lifting.  If there was time, students could remove their tape from their birch trees shape.

On Day 2, we focused on creating the textures observed in the fallen leaves and birch tree. We learned how to reuse old credit cards as stamps, dipping them in black tempera paint and scrapping them on our birch trees shape.  This created the black and gray horizontal marking found on real birch trees. Lastly, we used our paint brushes to create quick dashes of autumn colors for our fallen leaves.  This texture was similar to the the one found in Gustav’s Klimt’s, Birch Forest I.  I’ve been wanting to do a birch tree art lesson for years and this one did not disappoint! It was so much fun from start to finish. These autumn landscapes are just fantastic!

Our autumn birch trees are currently outside the art room! They have gotten a lot of attention from parents, staff, and students  walking by!

Falling Leaves, 3rd Grade

This is a lesson near and dear to my heart. This is the third year I’ve taught it, and it just keeps getting better! This year, our third grade artists choose the time of day they wanted to capture their falling leaves.  Third time’s the charm! I just love the emotion and personality in each work of art!

Enjoy these beautiful falling leaves, created by our 3rd grade artists.

A batik is a traditional method of producing colored designs on textiles by applying wax and dye. Instead of using the traditional materials, we created our batiks by using crayons, oil pastels, tempera paint and white paper. We began by studying our leaves organic shapes and texture. We arranged our leaves so there was balance and harmony in our composition. The texture rubbing technique was used to create each leaves shape and veins. We used oil pastels to mix and blend colors inside the blade part of our leaves, making them look so realistic!  Our 3rd graders did a wonderful job blending colors, creating values, and making their leaves look so delicate and beautiful.

We began the batik process by first wrinkling our papers into a ball, making sure that our artwork was on the inside. Carefully, we unfolded our paper and smoothed out the creases. Next, students brought their papers to the painting station, where they covered their whole paper with blue and purple tempera paint.  Lastly, students brought their projects to the sink area, where we ran water over our paper and watched as the paint ran off our leaves. Our backgrounds (negative space) held the paint and made for a beautiful backdrop to our vivid fall leaves. Our 3rd graders captured all that is sweet and special about Fall, the slight breeze, rich color, and crisp air.

Exploring Lines, Kindergarten

IMG_7701Kindergarten is flying high in art!

Can you guess the element of art our Kindergarteners have been busy exploring? If you thought lines, you are correct!  Our Kindergarten friends have been learning all about lines. Our unit on line got started with a special poem titled, “Larry the Line”.  You can find this wonderful poem on Cassie Stephens art blog! After learning the words and the hand motions to the poem, students got to meet Larry (the stuffed animal snake) and practice creating lines with his body. We put all our knowledge to great use when we began creating our hot air balloons. We used a variety of lines (vertical, diagonal, horizontal, spiral, curved, and angle lines) to decorate the inside of our balloon shape. Next, we explored color and learned how to use our paint brushes like a ballerina, (on their toes not on their bottoms).After being introduced to tempera paint, students began adding colors to their hot air balloons to make them look realistic. We decorated squares with vertical and horizontal lines to make them look like realistic baskets. After cutting and attaching string, Kindergarten was ready for take off. Art has been such a sweet adventure with TG’s youngest artists! Oh the places you’ll go in ART!

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Check out our first project of the school year, now on display outside the  cafeteria. We are currently learning about shapes and have been busy creating Indian corn, leaves, and Monsters. Stay tuned for those projects. They just went home with your budding artist!

The sky’s the limit!

Kandinsky Paintings, 2nd Grade

When you see color, do you hear music? Wassily Kandinsky believed that color, line, and music went together like Yin to Yang.  A pioneer of the abstract art movement, Kandinsky approached color with a musician’s sensibility. We began this lesson by looking at Kandinsky’s work. We used two different painting by Kandinsky to create our very first painting of the year.

       Several Circles                                                    Yellow, Red and Blue 

 

Our discussions centered on color, line, shape, and emotion. To get us hearing in color we listened to classical music as we worked. We used the white side of our cardboard circles to focus on Kandinsky inspired lines. As we listened to music, we created a variety of lines. For example, spiral, mountain, curved, horizontal, vertical, and diagonal.

We then discussed how music can evoke emotion and used different colors to fill in the white spaces on our boards. We listened to different kinds of music and thought about how the sounds made us feel. We used the first color that popped into our heads to capture the sounds and emotion.

 

On our second meeting day, we looked at the painting, Several circles, and used our observation skills to answer questions, what do you see? What do you think? What do you wonder? On the reverse side of our cardboard, students created several circles. We used white tempera paint on our black boards to create contrast. This created a background for color to be applied. I just love turning these boards over and over again,  admiring the contrast of line, shape color, and emotion! These Second Grade painting marked the first project of the school year! They have since gone home. However, I couldn’t help but share these gems on our art blog! Aren’t they fantastic!!!!

Enjoy these abstract painting created by our second grade artists. Inspiration for this project came from Cassie Stephens blog! Thanks for the inspiration Cassie!

Keith Haring inspired Figures, 4th grade

These Keith Haring action poses were created by our fantastic fourth grade artists. We began the year by using Keith Haring’s iconic style and images to review our art room rules, create a collaborative mural, and make 4 dynamic action poses.

IMG_7556We did some practice drawings in our sketchbooks to get us familiar with Keith Haring’s distinct style. These colorful and dynamic works of art are currently on display outside the art room.

We learned how to draw a Keith Haring figure by first creating a stick figure and then giving it body! After drawing an outline around the stick figure, we erased our original “skeleton” lines. We practiced drawing light and filling our space with an exciting action pose. Later, students mixed and applied tempera paint to create flat areas of color similar to that of Haring’s work. Do you notice the use of complementary colors? Students used contrasting colors in two of their four action compositions. 4M created one action composition due to time. We completed this project by using our sharpie markers to outline our dynamic figures and create expression lines. Students used bold lines and vivid colors to bring their Keith Haring inspired figures to life. I have a new found love for Keith Haring’s art.

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Indian corn, 1st Grade

Tara   Reegan   Lorenzo   Jack

Our first grade artists have been busy creating these beautiful indian corn paintings. I’ve loved watching these observational drawings come to life! We begin this project by looking at a photograph of Indian corn and using our observational skills to answer questions like; What do you see? What do you think? What do you wonder? Once we identified the subject matter for our next project, we read the book, “Corn” by Gail Gibbons. We looked at how corn grows, how it got its name, How many different kinds of corn there are, and how it is used in our food and the food of animals.

With the help of some real indian corn, students got to work studying the shape of the cob, the husk and the kernels. We drew these observations using sharpie markers. Once our shapes and lines were drawn, it was time for color! Students used pan watercolor sets and liquid watercolor to mix colors and paint their kernels. Students brought their indian corn to life and off the paper by creating a wood texture for the background and even adding a shadow to make their corn look 3 dimensional!  I Just love looking at these fall still lifes. They currently on display for all to see an admire!

Character Counts!

Our final three collaborative murals are now complete!  Take a look at the work of our Kindergarten, First, and Fourth Grade Artists. They used the elements of art to illustrate their grade levels character values.

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Grade Four, Citizenship                                            Kindergarten, Caring 

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Grade One, Fairness

It was so nice meeting my Monday classes yesterday, and finally getting to piece together our mystery murals. Students enjoyed working together to create one unified piece of art! I love the rainbow of color now filling the hallway outside the art room. Check out all six pillars of character! 

T.R.R.F.C.C.