shapes

Paul Klee inspired fish, 3rd Grade

Paul kleeHere’s a look back at a 3rd grade project finished a couple weeks back. We began by looking at Paul Klee’s painting, “Goldfish”. This was a great lesson because it allowed us to review a lot of art elements and concepts. We begin day one by creating our center fish. Students use lines and shapes to make a realistic or fantasy fish in the center of their paper. We observed how Paul Klee used vivid, and bright colors to make his fish stand out from the background. We reviewed warm and cool colors and used them to create our fish and habitat. We also reviewed lines, patterns and shapes and used them to create visual texture in our fish.

On day two we focused on the smaller fish and plant life around the edges of the paper, creating a decorative border. We learned that Klee’s, “Goldfish” was painted using two kinds of paints: watercolor and oil paints. The watercolor allowed for thinner more translucent effects. The oil paints for thicker, more vivid colors. Instead of oil paints we used oil pastels to acquire the same painterly qualities. This allowed us to create a watercolor resist! Enjoy these fishy creations made by our 3rd grade artists.

See-Think-Wonder

Part of being a great artist is being able to observe and talk about art. We’ve gotten started many new units of study this year, by answering the following three questions; What do you see? What do you think? What do you wonder? 

This visual thinking routine has encouraged our artists to make thoughtful observations and interpretations when looking at art. I’ve also loved listening to our students develop their own ideas and questions about the art they are studying. It’s been a great lead into a new unit of study. In this case, it was Paul Klee’s, “Goldfish”. This was a great painting to study since there is so much mystery to it.

 

Indian corn, 1st Grade

Tara   Reegan   Lorenzo   Jack

Our first grade artists have been busy creating these beautiful indian corn paintings. I’ve loved watching these observational drawings come to life! We begin this project by looking at a photograph of Indian corn and using our observational skills to answer questions like; What do you see? What do you think? What do you wonder? Once we identified the subject matter for our next project, we read the book, “Corn” by Gail Gibbons. We looked at how corn grows, how it got its name, How many different kinds of corn there are, and how it is used in our food and the food of animals.

With the help of some real indian corn, students got to work studying the shape of the cob, the husk and the kernels. We drew these observations using sharpie markers. Once our shapes and lines were drawn, it was time for color! Students used pan watercolor sets and liquid watercolor to mix colors and paint their kernels. Students brought their indian corn to life and off the paper by creating a wood texture for the background and even adding a shadow to make their corn look 3 dimensional!  I Just love looking at these fall still lifes. They currently on display for all to see an admire!